Stock phrases: you gotta love ’em

I’m always late to the party.

“Heroes” aired on television several years ago, but I’ve just discovered it. It’s a creative TV drama with a lot of the characteristics of comic books, which also happen to be important to the plot. hero.

I think the stock phrases in “Heroes” are inevitable, likely penned by writers who were chuckling as they wrote.

Here are a few stock phrases from the series:

I told you never to call me.

We’ve got a problem.

I’ve always loved you.

We’ve got to get out of here.

What are we going to do?

It’s not my fault.

That’s a good question.

You can do this!

Look out!

“Heroes” has been fun to watch.

Your turn, wordsmiths and culture-watchers. What are your favorite (or most dreaded) stock phrases? And/or, what did you think of the series?

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8 Comments

Filed under "Heroes", comic books, Stock Phrases, Writing

8 responses to “Stock phrases: you gotta love ’em

  1. I took a creative writing class in high school, and back then we called them “pre-fab sentences”. Basically, sentences ready to go.

    “way to go”
    “the fact of the matter”
    “see for yourself”

  2. I love Heroes! It’s so badly written but SO FUN. I loved Zachary Quinto in it. The stock phrases are the least of its problems, hahaha. I’m still waiting for Peter to get his Irish girlfriend back from the future.

  3. I liked the first couple of seasons of Heroes, but it lost steam for me.

    As far as stock sentences go… they’re my stock in trade! Like cliches, if they are used creatively, or turned on their heads, they can be great sources of humor — mostly in dialog or first person narration, though. They get to be tedious in third person narration, IMHO, and I know that some people can’t stand them in any form, much like some can’t stand puns.

    Here’s one example from Hyperlink (since you’ve read the book, I know you’ll know what I mean). Jimmie has just discovered that God is using his thoughts against him, and he’s fed up with his clothes and shoes disappearing, or changing without warning. Here, he’s talking to God in his thoughts:

    So You’re holding my thoughts against me, huh? Baby needs a new pair of shoes.
    But no dice.

    • Agreed. Heroes does lose its power. I’m just watching now to see how the series catches up lose threads (or not). Stock phrases can be appropriate to the character, funny and satirical. Like your book, Hyperlink from Hell, long may it live!

  4. Heroes started off very good but sadly fell apart towards the end. save the cheerleader!

    mood
    Moody Writing

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