Kindle, Uncategorized

Hundreds of Kindle books on sale everyday

You don’t have to have a Kindle to enjoy these ebooks, currently reduced in price. You can download a free Kindle app for your tablet or phone or desktop.paperwhite_bw

The link below will take you to the day’s current sales. Browse and enjoy!

See the books here.

Get a free Kindle app here.

historical fiction, Kindle, Reading

Do you know about this Audible bargain?

“Add Audiobook for $1.99” add audible

Audible (recorded) books do not come on tape or compact disc–you listen on your Kindle, phone, or computer. A subscription currently costs $14.95 per month, with the first month free. But many Audible books are available at a small added cost when you buy the Kindle ebook. I think this is also true if you bought it earlier.

If there’s an Audible version, a notice appears at the right of the ebook page.

I checked a number of online forums to make certain you don’t have to be an Audible subscriber to get this special price. For me, this seems like a great deal. Of course the producers and authors don’t get much out of it–my royalty for The Girl on the Mountain audiobook sold this way is less than 50 cents.

Girl-audiobook.350x350
Audible edition

Lots of people say they like to listen to the narration as they read. That may be similar to my preference for having English subtitles on video–seeing as well as listening improves the experience. My oldest Kindle has a text to speech feature, but it’s a machine-made robot voice, not the real-person narration you get in an audiobook.

I am not an Audible subscriber, though if I had a long commute every day I’d definitely pay for this kind of entertainment, and I may subscribe someday if my eyes get worse.

Meanwhile, getting a recorded version for $1.99 sounds like a great deal.

 

 

drafting, Editing, Kindle, revising, Writing

Editing made easy

Okay, not easy. Easier.

You’ve probably heard that reformatting your word processing page single-spaced with narrow margins (making it look more like a book page) is one way to get fresh eyes on your work-in-progress. Even better, if you have a Kindle, try the personal document feature (Send to Kindle) to examine your manuscript. A different format helps you notice problems. For example, until I read my current project on Kindle, I didn’t see I needed another sentence in the first paragraph.

If you’re like me, you edit as you write. All advice is against this, but too bad, I can’t help it. Often when I finish a scene I examine it in MS Word’s two-page view. This is very handy for seeing across a lot of text, spotting sentence pairs with identical construction, the same word repeated too often, etc.

I hope at some point you read your text aloud, a tried and true method to reveal shabby writing. And here’s my newest technique:

Don’t just read your text aloud, record it! Then listen to it while you study your word processing page.

When you think you’re ready to publish, don’t. Submit your work to a critique group like critiquecircle.com. Not every bit of advice you receive may work for your project, but CC writers can teach you a lot. Some writers post several drafts of each novel whether they intend to submit it to an agent or self-publish.

Finally, if you self-publish, be kind to your book and hire an editor. It’s what every publisher does.