Books by Carol Ervin, ebook series, historical fiction, Historical Fiction Series, Kindle, main characters, writing fiction

The People in my Stories

Charlie’s eyes shifted to his brother. “Will spits ’bacca juice at me.”

“Charlie lies,” Will said.

These are the first words we hear from two young brothers in The Girl on the Mountain, the first book in my Mountain Women series. When I introduced these boys, I had no idea how they would impact the story and no intention of writing a series. In their first appearance, Will and Charlie are eleven and nine and are learning how to survive in a poor family with an abusive father and no mother. The main character, May Rose, has been charged with taking care of the family, which includes the boys’ baby sister, neglected to the point of abuse. Throughout the series, these three children grow up to be important to Winkler, the fictional town that’s the setting for each novel, but they remain secondary characters.

This, I think, is what life is like. We are the main characters of our own stories, but our lives are affected by the secondary and minor characters who make up our world. The thirteen novels in the Mountain Women Series present the lives of people in difficult circumstances who manage to carry on, driven by their own determination but also helped by the characters around them.

The main character (May Rose) is most revealed as she becomes attached to destitute children. First there’s thirteen-year-old Wanda, whom May Rose meets after being abandoned by her husband. May Rose is only a few years older than Wanda and doesn’t know how she’s going to take care of herself. Wanda is essentially homeless, the daughter of an alcoholic prostitute, but she has the confidence May Rose lacks. Throughout the series, Wanda becomes the most important secondary character (and a favorite of readers). She is also the main character of book two in the series, Cold Comfort.

I find writing a series to be easier than writing stand-alone stories because I do not have to invent many new characters and settings. Each of my stories introduces one or more new people who in some way affect the plot. Currently I’ve been reading about the Civilian Conservation Corps, a program in Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal during the great depression. I expect to fit the CCC into the lives of my characters in the next story.

Currently the time period of the series is 1897 to 1934. I’ve written a draft of the final book in the series, set in 1976, in which May Rose is ninety-two. That book won’t be released until I’ve filled in the years with a few others. 

Writing has been a great retirement pursuit. I enjoy the people in my stories, and it’s been gratifying to hear from readers who say they like them too. Thanks for reading!

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Kindle, Uncategorized

Hundreds of Kindle books on sale everyday

You don’t have to have a Kindle to enjoy these ebooks, currently reduced in price. You can download a free Kindle app for your tablet or phone or desktop.paperwhite_bw

The link below will take you to the day’s current sales. Browse and enjoy!

See the books here.

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historical fiction, Kindle, Reading

Do you know about this Audible bargain?

“Add Audiobook for $1.99” add audible

Audible (recorded) books do not come on tape or compact disc–you listen on your Kindle, phone, or computer. A subscription currently costs $14.95 per month, with the first month free. But many Audible books are available at a small added cost when you buy the Kindle ebook. I think this is also true if you bought it earlier.

If there’s an Audible version, a notice appears at the right of the ebook page.

I checked a number of online forums to make certain you don’t have to be an Audible subscriber to get this special price. For me, this seems like a great deal. Of course the producers and authors don’t get much out of it–my royalty for The Girl on the Mountain audiobook sold this way is less than 50 cents.

Girl-audiobook.350x350
Audible edition

Lots of people say they like to listen to the narration as they read. That may be similar to my preference for having English subtitles on video–seeing as well as listening improves the experience. My oldest Kindle has a text to speech feature, but it’s a machine-made robot voice, not the real-person narration you get in an audiobook.

I am not an Audible subscriber, though if I had a long commute every day I’d definitely pay for this kind of entertainment, and I may subscribe someday if my eyes get worse.

Meanwhile, getting a recorded version for $1.99 sounds like a great deal.