historical fiction, Historical Fiction Series, Mountain Women Series, period fiction, sequel

There’s a new book in town…

Some say the new woman in town is a troublemaker, but the town of Winkler is already in trouble. Two years after the stock market crash, hard times have come to everyone. As the population declines and the mine threatens to close, May Rose and her friends work to save the school, the hospital and the town with their talents and persistence. By the end of 1932, an orphan has found a home, two friends have become a couple, and the new woman in town may be the one who can save it.

Down in the Valley in ebook is $3.99 on Amazon and free to subscribers of Kindle Unlimited. The paperback will come soon. https://amzn.to/3nuaJCi

beautiful writing, Bob Summers, David Lawlor, ebook publishing, indie publishing, John L. Monk, Lindy Moone, sequel, Writing, writing a sequel

Blogs that make my day

Every time I open WordPress, my blog reader gives me images and words that make me look and think more than twice.

I’ve explored only a few of the millions available, for talent abounds and there’s little time. Here are some that give me joy every day.

The strong, sassy, self-deprecating attitude of Bob Summer’s blog, which doesn’t for a minute conceal the caring writer behind it. This short story shows Bob’s talent:  http://bit.ly/17K2NRj

The art of Ray Ferrer, stark black and white images, some or all done with spray paint. Check it out here: http://bit.ly/12eEIRj

Almost daily I get my snorts and giggles from Lindy Moone and John L. Monk, the quickest wits I know.

Like this from Lindy: Do you suffer from Premature E-Publication? http://bit.ly/156smJg

Both Lindy and John dazzle me with their language. Here’s John’s “Disturbing incident at work today: they found out I’m a writer.” http://bit.ly/19fBtsc

I enjoy discovering side bits of history on David Lawlor’s blog, History with a Twist. Check out his archives, starting with “Mrs. Nash, the Transvestite with Custer’s Seventh Cavalry.” http://bit.ly/1bmLUxk

Some blogger personalities shine, and that’s what I like about run4joy59’s blog. I was profoundly moved by this post: Doing the right thing? http://bit.ly/15opxSH

Finally, the award for most uplifting–my eyes are filled with wonder at every submission by nature photographer Janson Jones, http://bit.ly/19fIppc

THANK YOU ALL!

Amazon, drafting, historical fiction, Ideas for a New Story, main characters, revising, sequel, Starting a New Story, The Girl on the Mountain, Writing

Writing from scratch

Writing from scratch is harder than cooking from scratch, unless you’re copying someone else’s recipe. When you write from scratch, you must concoct the ingredients, too.

The first ingredient of The Girl on the Mountain grew from my dream about a poor child huddled in bushes at the door of a privileged home. An open carriage stopped at the door and a man pulled his children roughly to the ground. One child fell, and the small girl rushed from hiding to help her. The story, I thought when I woke up, might be about the poor girl and the privileged children who’d just lost their mother.

I pursued that idea, looked at pictures of carriages, imagined scenes for the child, created her history, and considered where and when the story might take place.  Eventually everything changed: I didn’t use the bush scene, reduced the children and their father to minor characters, made the poor girl a lot older, and forgot about the carriage.

Before reaching that point, I’d recorded even the least promising idea in my messy spiral notebook and the better-organized OneNote Notebook, part of Microsoft Office, sometimes waking at night and scribbling a note in the dark.

I thought a lot about the main character and possible bumps in her road, and tested ideas in brief scenes.  In a OneNote section labeled “Problems,” I created a page of “Character Problems” and one of “Author Problems.”  Author Problems included things like “Why would she be in that place at that time?”

My OneNote research section grew to 49 pages. There I also pasted pictures, thanks to Internet, of period features like decorative iron gates and primitive washing machines, and copied words to a Fanny Crosby hymn and quotes from Longfellow’s Evangeline.  I did not use most of my research, including descriptions of glove-making and instructions for cleaning a slop jar.  Images from the period were very helpful. One of my characters reacts to this beautiful engraving from an old edition of Evangeline, depicting Acadians forced from their homeland:

Researching more than I needed for the story made me comfortable with the culture of a logging town in 1899 and aware of influences on my characters, including what they read.

My current project continues the story of Wanda and Will from The Girl on the Mountain, so I’m not writing this one completely from scratch.#